Yagazie Emezi

DEDICATED TO THE CULTURAL PRESERVATION OF THE AFRICAN AESTHETIC.

Cultural Anthropologist & Africanist
Artist

None of the images posted here belong to me unless stated otherwise.

Footage of rescue of mother & her children from the attack at Westgate Mall in Kenya.

 - I was so stressed out watching this video because if something goes wrong, you know how some African channels show everything. I wonder what was the point of all that crawling only that stand in the end, but how can I even imagine the situation!?  

Artificial catch you
You be man or woman
Na you go catch am yourself
Na your money go do am for you
You go yellow pass yellow
You go catch moustache for face
You go get your double colour
Your yansh go black like coal
You self go think say you dey fine
Who say you fine?- Fela Kuti

Using various forms of mixed-media, Ng’endo Mukii is a filmmaker and animator and her thesis film, Yellow Fever is about women’s use of hair-straightening and skin bleaching products,

I am interested in the concept of skin and race, and what they imply; in the ideas and theories sown into our flesh that change with the arc of time. The idea of beauty has become globalized  creating homogenous aspirations, and distorting people’s self-image across the planet. In my film, I focus on African women’s self-image, through memories and interviews; using mixed media to describe this almost schizophrenic self-visualization that I and many others have grown up with.”

studioafrica:

The show Portraits in Black was accompanied by a catalogue showing images and three essays about photography, pentecostalism, immigration. Marco Ambrosi teamed with  Aldo Sodoma and Matteo Danesin to capture life within the Nigerian and Ghanian pentecostal community. All the people photographed, live in Italy and this project throws light onto a subject most of us have had to deal with as African immigrants; finding a community in a new/foreign place. 

After my run, got informed by my mother that she had accidentally locked my cat out overnight. Thus ruining my morning. All I could think about was my poor, fluffy, spoiled rotten baby out there in the cold all night. So I dashed back home with tears streaming down my face, cursing my mother for her carelessness and damning myself for not noticing her absence before going to sleep. Distraught, I was. I don’t think I’ve been that upset in a while.

Fives minutes into frantically calling out her name, my cat responds with a feline chatter, parades out of a neighbor’s backyard and casually trots back home.

Feel free to call me a crazy cat lady at any point.

It’s not even 6:15 yet but GUESS who agreed to go on a 6:30am run, AS A DATE!?!? Wtf is wrong with me. I just want to sleep. I’ve had 3 hours of sleep because I chose to go out last night and drink. Look at my life. Look at my choices. 

Sharing with you all my hair wash process! JUST the hair wash!…. Done by a very lazy me. (remember that awesome HD quality fyi!!) 

yagazieemezi:

If you are presented with a negative situation or a negative individual;  it is up to YOU to decide how to let that entity affect your life. YOU give it permission to have a positive, negative or no impact at all in your daily routine.

If you treat someone in a shitty manner, it’s because you are a shitty person. We all can be shitty people at times, but the difference is that I have no problem admitting or apologizing for my wrongs. If someone is shitty to you, and you’re shitty back, YOU’RE JUST AS SHITTY AS THAT PERSON.

Apologies are FREE. Humility is FREE. I WILL turn the other cheek for you to slap because, that costs NOTHING to me. It isn’t priceless. It takes NOTHING out of me. Because I CHOOSE and FILTER the positives from the negatives. Negative people and situations are worthless to me. My energy cannot be wasted on such rubbish. 

Be positive and GOOD towards people. And even if you get nothing in return, you’re still doing the right thing. - Yagazie

Asker mindwine Asks:
I'm glad you're getting better/have gotten better. Those two photos are extremely powerful.
yagazieemezi yagazieemezi Said:

Ah, thank you very much, dear! I’m happy to be happy!

yagazieemezi:

Having one of those days. Time to venture outside.

Going through my archives and came across this. Interestingly enough, I took this picture when I was just emerging from months of suicidal thoughts and depression. I clearly was getting better to the point of taking self-portraits again and looking back at this now, it’s just a little bit symbolic of exactly what I was going through in terms of being so low, but pulling myself out of it to the point of physically leaving my bed/house and exploring beyond myself. - Yagazie

I simply MUST display another of David Pace’s series: Friday Night because he gets it.

Friday night at Le Cotonnier. The evening calm is shattered by distorted bass blaring through blown speakers. The insistent beat sends a message across the village and into the fields beyond:

There is a ball tonight at Le Cotonnier

Tonight we will pound our feet on the concrete slab where millet was drying in the midday sun only hours ago. Tonight we will be transported by the ecstatic music from Cote d’Ivoire and Niger. Tonight we will drink warm beer and, as if in a trance, we will forget about yesterday. And dance, dance, dance…

Each year I spend the fall in the West African country of Burkina Faso. There I teach digital photography to American college students in a study abroad program through Santa Clara University. 

Friday is market day and people from all the neighboring villages gather to shop and socialize. On most Friday nights there is a dance at Le Cotonnier, a small outdoor bar on the edge of Bereba. A noisy gas generator powers an antiquated music system and a local DJ spins African CDs. The dancers range in age from small children to older adults. On the concrete dance floor they perform intricate routines, combining moves by James Brown and Michael Jackson with hip-hop and tribal dance steps. I join them, photographing as we dance. 

It is dark and everyone is in constant motion. I love the energy, the heat, the movement, and the way my flash captures these moments that otherwise go unseen.
— David Pace

And oldie of mine earlier this year when I was in NY: “I’ve moved 5 times in less than two years and I now realize the emotional energy it takes to set up even a shadow of a home and so, my walls remain bare. But best of all, things have only gotten better.”

….then things got worse lol. But better again.

(via yagazieemezi)

"Whosoever is delighted in solitude, is either a wild beast or a god." - Aristotle

Spent some quality time alone (which is fairly normal) yesterday. But instead of remaining cooped up indoors, I grabbed my camera and drove in hopes of catching a few sights of the thunder storm. Ended up in the middle of nowhere with only the wind, a few birds and the smell of light dust to keep me company. - Yagazie

(via yagazieemezi)

studioafrica:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter, swear words and insults, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie

Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.

Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. Source

When I told my BFF this, she was like,”image

But you have….”

"DON’T TELL ME WHAT I HAVE OR HAVE NOT DONE IN MOMENTS OF THIRST, BITCH!"

The thing is, from the very first time, having sex with someone … for the first time has always been awkward for me or just not that great because I don’t know the person’s body and we’re trying to figure out what each other is into (at least I am).  So first time sex in my old relationships were just okay or meh, but the thing is, it got better because we spent more time together, cared about each other, blah blah, etc. And with casual sex partners, I’m just not in it, ya know? Because it’s casual, there’s no telling how long you guys will interact for … seeing as you’re not on that relationship bs and because of that why should I put in allllll my sexy efforts/skills when you’re not the full package? A bitch needs cuddling and lots of paid meals. Ugh and what if you like me and I don’t see you that way. Then you have…..expectations. Currently, I’m a serial monogamist who has spent all of my adult life so far in a relationship so I just don’t know how to have sex with someone I don’t care about on a relationship level.

But what I’m really trying to say is, at my age personally, I can’t afford to have whack dick. - Yagazie

studioafrica:

Baudouin Mouanda, recognized for his photography of The Sapeurstakes on his new project "The Dream" to support his research and belief that beauty can be found everywhere by capturing his models in environments normally seen as unattractive. 

"As part of the Generation Elili collective, he is active in promoting Congolese photography and staging exhibitions for the local community, even when everything from infrastructure to finance seems to be against them.

"I look at Africa with positivity," says Mouanda, "I don’t see Africa from the perspective of people who never came here. I see Africa as a continent that will surprise people tomorrow. I’m sure of it.""