Yagazie Emezi

DEDICATED TO THE CULTURAL PRESERVATION OF THE AFRICAN AESTHETIC.

Cultural Anthropologist & Africanist
Artist

None of the images posted here belong to me unless stated otherwise.

iyalode:

Guadeloupe’s own Mariette Monpierre will be featured on Indigo Tongues series in December. The director of the film Elza is the first woman to direct a feature length film out of Guadeloupe.

On set yesterday with Mariette…a very pleasant interview, talking films, Guadelope, life in Paris and much more… For those of you that haven’t seen Indigo Tongues check us out at www.iyalodeproductions.com with our debut interview with Funmi Iyanda from Nigeria. 

studioafrica:

Free The Town by Nikyatu Jusu - A forthcoming feature film set in Freetown, Sierra Leone

Exciting news! Bold and endlessly talented Sierra-Leonean/American filmmaker Nikyatu Jusu is working on a feature film set in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

This is the director who gave us that sparkling first short African Bootyscratcher and the lyrical Say Grace Before Drowning (if you haven’t seen them, do yourself a favour and click those links).

Nikyatu recently tweeted Achebe’s injunction to Africans, repeated by Adichie, to tell their own stories, and that’s what she plans to do: “make a film by the people, for the people”. Free The Town is currently looking for funding, so donate at the indiegogo campaign page if you can. 

Hit play on the teaser above and check out the synopsis + links below:

FREE THE TOWN is Nikyatu Jusu’s feature film debut: As 17 year old Binta runs from a past riddled with accusations, she collides with two strangers: a Brooklyn teen reuniting with his estranged African father, and a European filmmaker relentlessly pursuing a story of African witch exorcisms. In a country struggling to progress, we discover the past often has an unshakeable grasp on the future.”

WEBSITE | VIMEO | FACEBOOK

Lupita Nyong’o posing for the cameras at the 12 Years A Slave Los Angeles Premiere.

'D'you know what happens when you hurt people?' Ammu said. 'When you hurt people, they begin to love you less. That's what careless words do. They make people love you a little less.'
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy.

Semi-clean-eating and daily 30 minute workouts. #ilooknothinglikeeitherpicsnow #timetogetback #maybe #selfmotivation #imlazy #thatblouseandbratho #letsdiscuss

Reminiscing on my yarn braids days. Giving my hairline a serious break. I use yarn braids because for me, it’s the cheapest form of protection for my hair during the winter. I hated having to pay to get my hair braided so one day thanks to youtube, I taught myself how to do it.

Pros:

- Cheap and easy to do.

- Low care & looks better over time. Long-lasting.

- Various styling options.

Cons:

- Yarn material is not too friendly on hair if not moisturized often.

- Pulls on hair line depending on length.

I use the synthetic Red Heart brand and have my braids in for usually two months. I’m not one for styling with braids so I just leave them down most of the time. Having yarn braids in is always a nice break from obessing over my afro and having to fiddle with it all the time. ( Add in your own helpful tips on yarn braids!)- Yagazie

(via yagazieemezi)

Good Morning! I'm not sure but I think I saw on your blog the remedy for dry skin on the face & now I can't find it. Can you please tell your secret again? ..if was you, ha :)
yagazieemezi yagazieemezi Said:

I used honey and sugar as a face scrub!!

kemiteko:

The amazing work of Loyiso Mkize

Loyiso Mkize is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. “creating visual art is a talent and gift i have enjoyed all my life. it has evolved into a tool that i use to express my views and ideas. I paint people and paint about people. our complex nature fascinates me and therefore compels me to expressively tell our story. My work is African and celebrates the beauty and wealth running in the veins of her people. its in the subjects eyes, lips, skin tone/texture, dress, hair, that i draw inspiration from. the experience and stories we carry with us are the corner stones from which we mold a new identity. it is the human spirit that i aim to share in my art.”

(via yagazieemezi)

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Waist Beads”
The growing popularity of waist beads as a trend in the West has led them to take on their own meanings and interpretations. Now, many women wear them as a form of personal expression or as a fashion statement. Although waist beads are not limited to any race, culture, or country, it is still very important to know and understand the significance of waist beads within African cultures.
Waist beads have a long history in Africa dating back to ancient Egypt and are worn for various reasons and purposes. They are a symbol and celebration of womanhood, sexuality, femininity, fertility, healing, spirituality, body shaping, first menses, protection, seduction, and wealth amongst other things. The meaning of the colors and different shapes of beads varies with every tribe and they can be thought of as a visual dialect. Each bead, color, and shape relays a different message depending on the receiver.
continue reading

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Waist Beads”

The growing popularity of waist beads as a trend in the West has led them to take on their own meanings and interpretations. Now, many women wear them as a form of personal expression or as a fashion statement. Although waist beads are not limited to any race, culture, or country, it is still very important to know and understand the significance of waist beads within African cultures.

Waist beads have a long history in Africa dating back to ancient Egypt and are worn for various reasons and purposes. They are a symbol and celebration of womanhood, sexuality, femininity, fertility, healing, spirituality, body shaping, first menses, protection, seduction, and wealth amongst other things. The meaning of the colors and different shapes of beads varies with every tribe and they can be thought of as a visual dialect. Each bead, color, and shape relays a different message depending on the receiver.

continue reading

(via yagazieemezi)

ukpuru:

TOP: 14. PAINTED ENTRY WALL OF COMMUNAL SHRINE. NIMO.

BOTTOM: 15. WALL PAINTERS IN FRONT OF THEIR WORK. NIMO. [Anambra State, Nigeria]

Compound Entryway Decoration Male Space and Female Creativity, Fred T. Smith, 1986.

[Cosmic]

(via nigerianostalgia)

Asker helpmesingit Asks:
Heyhey! Saw you walking down Broadway yesterday lookin FRESH! We passed eachother so quickly...didn't have a chance to say hi. Sending love :)
yagazieemezi yagazieemezi Said:

Ahaha thank you! Next time, say hi??!

With my cartoons, I draw directly from my personal life. From battling with boyfriends over having my hair in their faces, to being the creepy big spoon and watching them sleep, to the single life struggle of loneliness and horniness, I simply apply my pen to paper to share with others what I thought at first were my experiences alone. I’m just happy that some of my little life facts are relatable to others. - Yagazie

Earle Hyman as The Prince of Morocco in “The Merchant of Venice.” The Shakespearean actor, now best known as Grandpa Huxtable on “The Cosby Show,” was photographed by Carl Van Vechten on March 10, 1953. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library via Vintage Black Glamour

Earle Hyman as The Prince of Morocco in “The Merchant of Venice.” The Shakespearean actor, now best known as Grandpa Huxtable on “The Cosby Show,” was photographed by Carl Van Vechten on March 10, 1953. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library via Vintage Black Glamour

Love this photograph by John Ferguson