Yagazie Emezi

DEDICATED TO THE CULTURAL PRESERVATION OF THE AFRICAN AESTHETIC.

Cultural Anthropologist & Africanist
Artist

None of the images posted here belong to me unless stated otherwise.
Recent Tweets @JujuJungleLove

soulbrotherv2:

Okayafrica’s Top 13 Films of 2013

2013 has been an exciting year in African film. This year, nine films by directors of African origin or dealing with Africa-related themes premiered at Sundance Film Festival, including powerful shorts by Fyzal Boulifa and Frances Bodomo (whose forthcoming film Afronauts has been selected for Sundance 2014). Chadian director Mahmat Saleh Haroun and Tunisian-born Abdellatif Kechiche took films to CannesHaroun followed Une Homme qui Crie with GriGris , which was not quite as brilliant as his first effort. Kechiche, however, was on the up and up, and his film Blue is the Warmest Colour made himjust the second African-descended filmmaker to win Cannes’ top prize, the Palme d’Or.  [Continue reading article and peruse list.]

(via blackfilm)

theculturedpearl:

foxxxynegrodamus:

THE PERILS OF THIRST:

Describing a few situations I’ve found myself in due to high levels of thirst. Learn from me!!! Needless to say, I’ve made a few mistakes and poor decisions in the past!

WTF IS YOUR LIFE YAGA?!!! HAHAHAHAHA

Literally one of the funniest ladies on Youtube. And when she jumps into her American accent to pronounce “thirst” cracks me UP!

Mali, Mopti Area, Bozo Girl, 1987 …..her skin is amazing, lawd.

Mali, Mopti Area, Bozo Girl, 1987 …..her skin is amazing, lawd.

Welcome new people! You didn’t ask, but I shall tell you anyway. I’m Yagazie. I tend to post mainly amazing shit and I spend way too much time snickering at stuff I see online. I welcome your questions and comments. I WELCOME THEM!!!! 

Danakil nomad mother and child. Danakil Depression, Great Rift Valley | © Victor Engelbert

Danakil nomad mother and child. Danakil Depression, Great Rift Valley | © Victor Engelbert

I was shocked I didn't see a post about African Film because I know there's a whole lot of films out there.
yagazieemezi yagazieemezi Said:

I just launched on day before yesterday though. Could you please give a woman some time? The site is meant to GROW, dear.

Her comment about carcinogens in the air, although somewhat true, is irrelevant to the fact that her "beauty" cream is yet another carcinogen in a golden-clad jar. What makes this so offensive is her choice in advertisement & brand name. Her "beauty transformation" is everything short of; the high exposure on her skin is unappealing. The brand name "Whitenicious" isn't any better. Everything about her product is quite the opposite of being black & beautiful, and I'm not sure she realises that.
yagazieemezi yagazieemezi Said:

foxxxynegrodamus:

Here’s a wonderful way to ring in black history month! yagazieemezi launched her new e-publication this morning: YAGAZIEEMEZI.com.

A site dedicated to the cultural preservation of the African aesthetic. It’s a curated agglomeration of all mediums of African and African Disporic art from photography and film to visual art and fashion.

Also featuring personal anecdotes, articles and intimate interviews by @yagazieemezi herself.

Check out this gem of greatness, head over to www.yagazieemezi.com

Asker exaltedstars Asks:
You are really cool <3 I'm a black girl in America, but I'd really wish that I could meet you. Come to the Bay Area some time?
yagazieemezi yagazieemezi Said:

Fly me out sometime? 

I kid, thank you though! Hopefully someday in the future!!

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Hungry Aba Gal”

Known for her long yarn braids and afro that touches the sun, Yagazie Ledi Francisca Emezi is an Igbo (Nigerian) and Tamil (Malaysian) artist born and raised in Aba, Nigeria. With two degrees in Cultural Anthropology and Africana Studies, she is dedicated to cultural preservation within the African community.

Yagazie is not only a talented artist and hairspiration for many women, but also a source of hope for those battling with an eating disorder. Openly sharing her battle with bulimia on her now defunct blog Hungry Aba Gal, Yagazie was able to bring light to an issue that is rarely addressed within African communities.

In whatever it is that she does, Yagazie freely expresses herself and her love for Africa. Rise Africa received the opportunity to interview Yagazie. Here’s what she had to say…

(via thesoulfunkybrother)

J.D. Okhai Ojeikere (1930-2014): In Memoriam

Press Release

With gratitude to God, we announce the passing away of our father, and an icon of photography, Pa J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere. He died in the afternoon of 2nd February after a brief illness. He was 83 years old. Burial announcements will be announced later. 

Ehiz’ Ojeikere, for the family. 

Known for his stunning documentation of hairstyles and sculptures, J.D. Okhai Ojeikere was a Nigerian photographer who began his career in 1954 as a darkroom assistant at the Ministry of Information, Ibadan. He was born in 1930 and bought his first camera in 1950, a Brownie D.

A year after Nigeria gained independence, he began working at Television House Ibadan as a studio photographer under Steve Rhodes. He joined the Nigerian Arts Council in 1967, and  1968 saw the start of his  documentation of Nigerian hairstyles, a project that would become his trademark. However, his first solo exhibition wasn’t till 1995, when his work showed in Nigeria and was also shown outside the country for the first time, as part of an exhibition in Switzerland.

“You know, nature gives every human being a role to play in life. It happened to be that by nature, I am created to be a photographer. And being a photographer does not mean that I have to cover all aspects of photography. I am not a war photographer, I am a civil photographer. And I have an urge to document culture, not wars and civil strife.” 

(READ MORE HERE)

Website / Facebook / Twitter 

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

AFRICAN PHOTOGRAPHY:

Today marks the start of Meet Your Photographer, a short series that will be introducing you to the contributing photographers of www.yagazieemezi.com over the next couple of weeks. You will be seeing their work on here fairly often so this is an excellent way for you to get familiar with these talented folks. 

My name is Fundiswa Ntoyi and I am a 22 year old South African-based creative with a passion for making beautiful portraits. I not only try to focus on the beauty of the people in my pictures but also to capture their souls; be it happiness, sadness, fear, confidence, and so on. Whatever emotion I can get out of someone, I want it to show in my work. 

Read more on what Fundiswa Ntoyi has to say…

Yagazie Emezi

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I can only speak as a Nigerian, but when it comes to our traditional attire as Africans, do you see it becoming more Western?

Among Igbo and Yoruba, I’m seeing an overload of  more fitted pants,skirts & blouses, is it still ‘traditional’? Or just another aspect of changing culture?

Wearing an ankara pencil skirt, a lace blouse and then a gele is not traditional attire…..OR AM I WRONG? 

Should we preserve certain ways of traditional dress or just move with fashion trends?

Join the conversation on TWITTER

Linda Forsell. Cause of Death: Woman

War (Congo)

A Girl’s pride is in a man’s house - proverb, Congo

In war, rape is a weapon. Every single day approximately 40 women are raped in Eastern Congo, hundreds of thousands were raped during the genocide in Rwanda in 1994, and Europe is no exception with in between  20.000 and 50.000 rapes during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The violations are not just a simple display of frustration among soldiers. It is a conscious military strategy through wich the opponent is humiliated and it’s moral reduced. Rape attacks break apart families, render leaders feeling powerless and inadequate and ruin communities; all in the same instance as giving the attackers an adrelanin surge and a sense of power.

1. All of these women were raped in attacks by the militia, in Eastern Congo.

2 & 3. The relentless violence perpetraded by different guerilla groups in the remote Eastern Congo strike women with adamant force. Rape is used as a weapon.

4. A young man with a large portion of regret in his voice, recollects how two of his four sisters were raped during an attack by the guerilla group FLDR.

5. Love used to be a child soldier.

6 & 7. Panzi Hospital was at first known as ‘the fistula hospital’ when it was founded in 1999, but the war victims soon took up more and more of the beds. Mutilated, raped and traumatized women sought out the well-ordered hospital area.

8. Pupils listen carefully when told about how you cannot treat women.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia & fotojournalismus)

(via ezibota)

Thousands of African migrants strike in IsraelJanuary 20, 2014
Tens of thousands of African migrants suspended a general strike Jan. 13 that had been in effect since January 5 in the Zionist state of Israel. The strike is scheduled to resume on Jan. 15 in the aftermath of the death of Ariel Sharon.
A list of demands put forward by the African community — most of whom come from Eritrea and South Sudan — calls for the nullification of the recently enacted Anti-Infiltrator Law, a halt to arresting people under that law, the release of those currently jailed and a review of asylum requests for Eritreans and Sudanese. The strike impacted the hotel, restaurant, café and cleaning services sectors of the Israeli economy.
Some 60,000 migrants from Eritrea and South Sudan have entered Israel since 2006. Over the last two years, a new detention facility has been constructed to hold migrants on the border with the Egyptian Sinai.
The migrants are forced to flee ongoing conflicts in Central and East Africa and the subsequent economic devastation they have created. These conflicts are a direct result of Western imperialist interference in the internal affairs of post-colonial African states.
Full article

Thousands of African migrants strike in Israel
January 20, 2014

Tens of thousands of African migrants suspended a general strike Jan. 13 that had been in effect since January 5 in the Zionist state of Israel. The strike is scheduled to resume on Jan. 15 in the aftermath of the death of Ariel Sharon.

A list of demands put forward by the African community — most of whom come from Eritrea and South Sudan — calls for the nullification of the recently enacted Anti-Infiltrator Law, a halt to arresting people under that law, the release of those currently jailed and a review of asylum requests for Eritreans and Sudanese. The strike impacted the hotel, restaurant, café and cleaning services sectors of the Israeli economy.

Some 60,000 migrants from Eritrea and South Sudan have entered Israel since 2006. Over the last two years, a new detention facility has been constructed to hold migrants on the border with the Egyptian Sinai.

The migrants are forced to flee ongoing conflicts in Central and East Africa and the subsequent economic devastation they have created. These conflicts are a direct result of Western imperialist interference in the internal affairs of post-colonial African states.

Full article