Yagazie Emezi

DEDICATED TO THE CULTURAL PRESERVATION OF THE AFRICAN AESTHETIC.

Cultural Anthropologist & Africanist
Artist

None of the images posted here belong to me unless stated otherwise.
inautumn-inkashmir:

'The Chand twins are the 1st African-American born Sikhs in the United States. Their parents converted to Sikhism in the 1960s after being inspired by the teachings of Yogi Bhajan.'
Fiona Aboud’s photographic essay, ‘Sikhs: An American Portrait’ 

inautumn-inkashmir:

'The Chand twins are the 1st African-American born Sikhs in the United States. Their parents converted to Sikhism in the 1960s after being inspired by the teachings of Yogi Bhajan.'

Fiona Aboud’s photographic essay, ‘Sikhs: An American Portrait’ 

(via foxxxynegrodamus)

How does it feel to be a tumblr star?
yagazieemezi yagazieemezi Said:

I honestly do not understand what that means, my dear. 

yagazieemezi:

Found a bunch of my pictures and decided to do a lil’ ol’  hair post on hair intimacy within a relationship.  Growing up, I was taught the importance of good hair hygiene and it was hammered into my head never to share a comb with anyone. These were the rules to good heath; clip your nails, never share a toothbrush or a comb, brush your teeth. I remember recoiling in horror when I discovered that my back then boyfriend  had accidentally used my toothbrush. I contemplated throwing it away. I have never shared a brush or a comb with anyone besides family. So I view sharing my hair with another with someone else as intimately as sharing any part of my body as well.

What do I mean by intimately? I mean getting to the roots of your hair; touching your scalp (yay head rubs!), knowing the way the hair works and accepting the hair in whatever form. In my previous relationship, the man said that he preferred straightened hair in general. Clearly, we were doomed from the start. At the beginning of my current (and marvelous heh heh) relationship, I remember refusing to be seen because my hair was only halfway done with braids. At this point of our relationship, he was watched me take out my braids. He has seen the nasty nature of the way hair gets after two months in braids. Clumps and all. He has helped me put in braids. He has washed my hair. And I insist on head rubs just about every day.

The thing is, there is a trust. You trust someone with something you take pride in. And they trust you because well … you have a clean scalp lol. It would be nasty to tell a guy to rub your head when your scalp is all kinds of dirty and flaky.
Personally speaking, I don’t understand how someone can be truly intimate with a woman who has a weave. I mean, he is touching all parts of your body except for you head! Nonetheless, if a woman has a weave, it is the partner who needs to understand that a weave must not be pulled at … and he or she should accept the weave wearing girlfriend (or boyfriend. Hey, it happens). If you’re bald, then your partner must know that head rubs feel damn good. If you have braids, he or she should know not to pull at it when you just got them in! Hair intimacy to me is the comforts of wearing your hair around your partner anyway you see fit and not being judged by it. Hair intimacy is loving your hair and having someone love it too in whatever state that it is in and however often the style changes. - Yagazie

(via m0dal-s0ul)

justbrad:

Check out my write-up on the South African cultural magazine MAHALA. Read more here: http://www.mahala.co.za/art/made-in-africa/

Finally met with @timokamuraart and his amazing work. #likedamn #art

Nomia’s Spring 2014 collection by Yara Flinn.

saleamnextchapter:

1stdark:

Lost Boys by Kerry James Marshall

(via kjohnlasoul)

iyalode:

Guadeloupe’s own Mariette Monpierre will be featured on Indigo Tongues series in December. The director of the film Elza is the first woman to direct a feature length film out of Guadeloupe.

On set yesterday with Mariette…a very pleasant interview, talking films, Guadelope, life in Paris and much more… For those of you that haven’t seen Indigo Tongues check us out at www.iyalodeproductions.com with our debut interview with Funmi Iyanda from Nigeria. 

studioafrica:

Free The Town by Nikyatu Jusu - A forthcoming feature film set in Freetown, Sierra Leone

Exciting news! Bold and endlessly talented Sierra-Leonean/American filmmaker Nikyatu Jusu is working on a feature film set in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

This is the director who gave us that sparkling first short African Bootyscratcher and the lyrical Say Grace Before Drowning (if you haven’t seen them, do yourself a favour and click those links).

Nikyatu recently tweeted Achebe’s injunction to Africans, repeated by Adichie, to tell their own stories, and that’s what she plans to do: “make a film by the people, for the people”. Free The Town is currently looking for funding, so donate at the indiegogo campaign page if you can. 

Hit play on the teaser above and check out the synopsis + links below:

FREE THE TOWN is Nikyatu Jusu’s feature film debut: As 17 year old Binta runs from a past riddled with accusations, she collides with two strangers: a Brooklyn teen reuniting with his estranged African father, and a European filmmaker relentlessly pursuing a story of African witch exorcisms. In a country struggling to progress, we discover the past often has an unshakeable grasp on the future.”

WEBSITE | VIMEO | FACEBOOK

Lupita Nyong’o posing for the cameras at the 12 Years A Slave Los Angeles Premiere.

'D'you know what happens when you hurt people?' Ammu said. 'When you hurt people, they begin to love you less. That's what careless words do. They make people love you a little less.'
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy.

Semi-clean-eating and daily 30 minute workouts. #ilooknothinglikeeitherpicsnow #timetogetback #maybe #selfmotivation #imlazy #thatblouseandbratho #letsdiscuss

Reminiscing on my yarn braids days. Giving my hairline a serious break. I use yarn braids because for me, it’s the cheapest form of protection for my hair during the winter. I hated having to pay to get my hair braided so one day thanks to youtube, I taught myself how to do it.

Pros:

- Cheap and easy to do.

- Low care & looks better over time. Long-lasting.

- Various styling options.

Cons:

- Yarn material is not too friendly on hair if not moisturized often.

- Pulls on hair line depending on length.

I use the synthetic Red Heart brand and have my braids in for usually two months. I’m not one for styling with braids so I just leave them down most of the time. Having yarn braids in is always a nice break from obessing over my afro and having to fiddle with it all the time. ( Add in your own helpful tips on yarn braids!)- Yagazie

(via yagazieemezi)